At what age do members of the opposite sex look best to men and women.  [Source] At what age do members of the opposite sex look best to men and women.  [Source]

At what age do members of the opposite sex look best to men and women.  [Source]

micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom


> Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?
Because it’s a bad idea. If you visit most poor country you’ll see that in markets people sell “charity” rice. They sell rice for a hundredth of what it should actually cost, because every time there is a humanitarian disaster many governments and charities buy western rice with donations and flood their markets with free rice. It makes sense, but it happens so many times that they put all the local farmers out of business. How could they compete with a free product?
What to make a difference? Donate to watsi (https://watsi.org/) and fund healthcare for poor people. Lend money on Kiva (http://www.kiva.org): you’ll get your money back and you’ll empower a worker. micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom


> Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?
Because it’s a bad idea. If you visit most poor country you’ll see that in markets people sell “charity” rice. They sell rice for a hundredth of what it should actually cost, because every time there is a humanitarian disaster many governments and charities buy western rice with donations and flood their markets with free rice. It makes sense, but it happens so many times that they put all the local farmers out of business. How could they compete with a free product?
What to make a difference? Donate to watsi (https://watsi.org/) and fund healthcare for poor people. Lend money on Kiva (http://www.kiva.org): you’ll get your money back and you’ll empower a worker. micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom


> Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?
Because it’s a bad idea. If you visit most poor country you’ll see that in markets people sell “charity” rice. They sell rice for a hundredth of what it should actually cost, because every time there is a humanitarian disaster many governments and charities buy western rice with donations and flood their markets with free rice. It makes sense, but it happens so many times that they put all the local farmers out of business. How could they compete with a free product?
What to make a difference? Donate to watsi (https://watsi.org/) and fund healthcare for poor people. Lend money on Kiva (http://www.kiva.org): you’ll get your money back and you’ll empower a worker. micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom


> Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?
Because it’s a bad idea. If you visit most poor country you’ll see that in markets people sell “charity” rice. They sell rice for a hundredth of what it should actually cost, because every time there is a humanitarian disaster many governments and charities buy western rice with donations and flood their markets with free rice. It makes sense, but it happens so many times that they put all the local farmers out of business. How could they compete with a free product?
What to make a difference? Donate to watsi (https://watsi.org/) and fund healthcare for poor people. Lend money on Kiva (http://www.kiva.org): you’ll get your money back and you’ll empower a worker. micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom


> Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?
Because it’s a bad idea. If you visit most poor country you’ll see that in markets people sell “charity” rice. They sell rice for a hundredth of what it should actually cost, because every time there is a humanitarian disaster many governments and charities buy western rice with donations and flood their markets with free rice. It makes sense, but it happens so many times that they put all the local farmers out of business. How could they compete with a free product?
What to make a difference? Donate to watsi (https://watsi.org/) and fund healthcare for poor people. Lend money on Kiva (http://www.kiva.org): you’ll get your money back and you’ll empower a worker.

micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”

It’s fairly simpleFollow micdotcom

> Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?

Because it’s a bad idea. If you visit most poor country you’ll see that in markets people sell “charity” rice. They sell rice for a hundredth of what it should actually cost, because every time there is a humanitarian disaster many governments and charities buy western rice with donations and flood their markets with free rice. It makes sense, but it happens so many times that they put all the local farmers out of business. How could they compete with a free product?

What to make a difference? Donate to watsi (https://watsi.org/) and fund healthcare for poor people. Lend money on Kiva (http://www.kiva.org): you’ll get your money back and you’ll empower a worker.

(via selene)

steveinaspeedo:

Don’t pen letters and drive.

(via)

(via adessolei)

needforcolor:

Poeta Brunello Robertetti - Corrado Guzzanti

needforcolor:

Poeta Brunello Robertetti - Corrado Guzzanti

(via zetterstrom)